Linguistics How Do I Chart A Coordination Complex If There Is No Conjunction?

Can a compound sentence not have a coordinating conjunction?

Note: You cannot use a comma to join these two independent clauses because there is no coordinating conjunction. When two independent clauses occur in the same sentence, the semicolon is mandatory.

How do you find a coordinating conjunction?

The three main coordinating conjunctions are ‘and’, ‘but’ and ‘or’.

  1. They can be used to join together two clauses in a sentence.
  2. You can add the coordinating conjunction ‘but’ in between these causes so the sentence reads:
  3. Remember though, you can often leave out the subject word in the second coordinating clause.

What is the rule for coordinating conjunctions?

FANBOYS is a mnemonic device, which stands for the coordinating conjunctions: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet, and So. These words, when used to connect two independent clauses (two complete thoughts), must be preceded by a comma. A sentence is a complete thought, consisting of a Subject and a Verb.

What can replace a coordinating conjunction?

Use a semicolon to join two related independent clauses in place of a comma and a coordinating conjunction.

What are 20 examples of compound sentences?

20 Compound Sentences in English

  • I want to lose weight, yet I eat chocolate daily.
  • A man may die, nations may rise and fall, but an idea lives on.
  • I used to be snow white, but I drifted.
  • We went to the mall; however, we only went window-shopping.
  • She is famous, yet she is very humble.
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What are 5 compound sentences?

5 Examples of Compound Sentences

  • I want to lose weight, yet I eat chocolate daily.
  • Michael did not like to read. She was not very good at it.
  • Dr. Mark said I could come to his office on Friday or Saturday of next week.
  • My favorite sport is skiing. I am vacationing in Hawaii this winter.

What are 5 examples of coordinating conjunctions?

Examples of Coordinating Conjunctions

  • You can eat your cake with a spoon or fork.
  • My dog enjoys being bathed but hates getting his nails trimmed.
  • Bill refuses to eat peas, nor will he touch carrots.
  • I hate to waste a drop of gas, for it is very expensive these days.

What are the 7 subordinating conjunctions?

Here are some common subordinating conjunctions: after, although, as, because, before, how, if, once, since, than, that, though, till, until, when, where, whether, while.

What are the 7 coordinating conjunctions?

The seven coordinating conjunctions are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.

What are the 8 coordinating conjunctions?

And, but, for, nor, or, so, and yet —these are the seven coordinating conjunctions. To remember all seven, you might want to learn one of these acronyms: FANBOYS, YAFNOBS, or FONYBAS. Coordinating conjunctions connect words, phrases, and clauses.

What are the three most common coordinating conjunctions?

Coordinating conjunctions are conjunctions that join, or coordinate, two or more equivalent items (such as words, phrases, or sentences). The mnemonic acronym FANBOYS can be used to remember the most common coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.

What are the four coordinating conjunctions?

Coordinating conjunctions are conjunctions that join, or “coordinate,” two or more items (such as words, clauses, or sentences) of equal importance. The major coordinating conjunctions are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. (You can use the acronym FANBOYS to remember these!)

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What are the 8 rules for commas?

What are the 8 rules for commas?

  • Use a comma to separate independent clauses.
  • Use a comma after an introductory clause or phrase.
  • Use a comma between all items in a series.
  • Use commas to set off nonrestrictive clauses.
  • Use a comma to set off appositives.
  • Use a comma to indicate direct address.

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